History

The history of the College of Social Sciences and Philosophy (CSSP), University of the Philippines (UP), dates back to the year 1910 although its name was given only in 1983. CSSP began as part of the College of Liberal Arts which was established on June 1910 by virtue of a decision of the UP Board of Regents.

The college previously existed as an institution called Junior College of Liberal Arts operated by the Bureau of Education of the Department of Public Instruction. At first it was named the College of Philosophy, Science and Letters before it was changed to the College of Liberal Arts on 30 January 1911. The college had two units-- the Junior College which offered two years of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts; and the Senior College which offered three years of study leading to the degree of Master of Arts. The coursework in the Junior College was such as to prepare the students who wished to enroll in professional course.

Before the start of the first semester of the academic year 1959-1960, the College of Liberal Arts was reorganized into three academic units -the University College, the College of Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. All three units, however, were served by only one faculty

The College of Liberal Arts was reorganized in order to solve the problem that may result with the implementation of the basic education program. The University College started its operations during the first semester of 1959-1960. It was given the task of teaching the general education courses, including the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences, for the first two years. To strengthen the foundation of a liberal education, the college was expected to continue the general education, as well as to correct some aspects taught in high school.

Meanwhile the third and subsequent years of college studies were handled by the College of Arts and Sciences which was mandated to continue offering undergraduate courses in the humanities, social scien-ces, natural and physical sciences, mathematics and languages. These disciplines were offered by the college as fields of specialization. As such, the third and subsequent years of college studies of a student were focused on one discipline for in-depth study, aside from other related disciplines, called free electives, which he may rake.

The different roles played by the University College and the College of Arts and Sciences necessitated separate administrations. To avoid the overlapping of roles of the two colleges and to integrate the various disciplines, three major divisions were formed to take the place of the academic departments -- the Division of Humanities, Division of Social Sciences, arid the Division of Natural Sciences. The traditional academic disciplines operated under their respective divisions without any departmental head

On 26 October 1983, the UP Board of Regents issued Administrative Order No.170 creating three new colleges from the former College of Arts and Sciences - the College of Social Sciences and Philosophy (CSSP), ripe College of Arts and Letters (CAL), and the College of Science (CS). Dr Francisco Nemenzo (1976-1981) of the Department of Political Science was the Dean of the CAS before it was split into three colleges.

The social sciences and philosophy are the foundation of a relevant university education. Students are encouraged to respond to the need for critical thought and inquiry, as well as to disseminate and refine the standards of values which they so constantly apply in daily living. The college, with the help and guidance of highly competent faculty and staff shares the vision of molding students to "search further into the depths of knowledge and to pursue truth."

The CSSP located at the Palma Hall, is composed of the following departments: Anthropology, Geography History, Linguistics, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology and Population Institute. The Third World Studies Program and the Folklore and Philippine Studies Program are also housed under the CSSP which also takes charge of the administration of Diliman Review, a quarterly publication-for the stu-dents of the three colleges.

(excerpts from "A brief history and organizational set-up of CSSP", CSSP Faculty Directory: Human Resources for Research, Training and Consultancy :1990)

Palma Hall

The history of the College of Social Sciences and Philosophy (CSSP), University of the Philippines (UP), dates back to the year 1910 although its name was given only in 1983. CSSP began as part of the College of Liberal Arts which was established on June 1910 by virtue of a decision of the UP Board of Regents.

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Palma Hall (more commonly known today as "AS" to the UP Community) is located at Roxas Avenue along the Academic Oval of the University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City. As one of the first buildings of U.P. Diliman since the approval of the transfer of U.P. Manila to Diliman, the responsibility of building Palma Hall fell on the shoulders of the first campus architect, Cesar Homero Rosales Concio. It was named after Rafael Palma (1874-1939), who served as president of the university from 1923 to 1933. It was formerly known as the Liberal Arts Building from 1951 to 1959, the Arts and Sciences or AS Building from 1960 to 1983, and now as the College of Social Science and Philosophy or CSSP Building from 1984 to present time. It currently houses the College of Social Sciences and Philosophy (CSSP).  Palma Hall is also where most of the courses of the Revitalized General Education Program (RGEP) are being held, thus making it one of the most frequented buildings in the university. Because of its strategic location and space, it is also where special events and activities are held, such as student demonstrations, miting de advances, student organization booths and exhibits, as well as the famous Oblation Run, among others.It is the place to see other students and to be seen. In more ways than one, Palma Hall or AS is the heart of the UP Diliman.

Art Works at Palma Halll

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"The Arts and Sciences" 

The mural at the AS Lobby, entitled "The Arts and Sciences", was made by National Artist, Vicente Manansala in 1960. With a length of 14 meters and a width of 2 meters, "The Arts and Sciences" is the biggest mural in the UP Diliman Campus.

AS Lobby Terrazo Granolithic Floor Design
The floor of the AS Lobby has a terrazzo granolithic design. It was also made by Vicente Manansala to match the mural. Its pattern of test tubes and abstract designs incorporates the college's two merged fields: the arts and the sciences. The material used to construct this design was granite.
 
"Isandaang Taon sa Bukang-Liwayway"

The mural at the second floor lobby was made by the University of the Philippines Artists' Circle (UPAC) Fraternity in 1996. The project was headed by former UPAC head Jan Carmichael Calleja.

According to Calleja, the title of the mural is "Isandaang Taon sa Bukang-Liwayway", not "Mga Natatanging Pilipino" as stated in the marker at the second floor lobby.

The UPAC was commissioned by the College of Social Sciences and Philosophy (CSSP) through former CSSP dean Consuelo J. Paz, with the recommendation of then College of Fine Arts (CFA) dean Nestor Vinluan and CFA college secretary Reuben Defeo.

The UPAC willingly took on the huge project with the theme "What is UP in relation to society?", which anticipated the Philippine Centennial celebration in 1998. The organization submitted a watercolor study to the CSSP which the college then approved. For the project, the UPAC was given a budget of around P 70,000.

UPAC artists worked long hours on the mural and some even camped at the second floor lobby. It was finished in three months.

"Isandaang Taon sa Bukang-Liwayway"

Working on the theme "What is UP in relation to society?", UPAC decided to show UP as being "at the center" of significant revolutionary events in the country, although this is not meant to be taken literally as some events depicted in the mural happened before UP was founded.

In the mural, the Oblation (symbolizing "pahinungod") at sunrise ("bukang-liwayway") symbolizes enlightenment or "kamulatan" at the need of the country for revolutionary change, with UP playing a vital role. The artists also wanted to send the message that even as UP approaches its own centennial year (2008), it is waking up to a new epoch (the Oblation at dawn with arms outstretched mimics a person waking up at sunrise); there are infinite possibilities, as the history of Philippine revolutionary events has shown. The placement of Andres Bonifacio at the center of the mural reflects UP student activism.

The mural did not adopt a particular style however the artists specifically veered away from abstraction and non-representation, and instead employed figuration and representation.